Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Smart Art

I have a lot of artistic friends.  Some of their specialties are painting, ceramics, design, photography, sculpting, and glass blowing.  No matter what their media they always impress me with their creativity.  One of these friends has recently opened an Etsy shop to sell her wearable art.  Make your fingers run, not walk, on your keyboard over to the HollyWoggles shop on Etsy.

*Image courtesy of http://www.etsy.com/shop/HollyWoggles all rights reserved by the artist, Holly Swenson.*  The Tianamen Square pendant from her protest series.
**DISCLAIMER: as with all products, services, or sites that I rave about on this blog, this is 100% unpaid and unsolicited advertisement for something that just makes me really happy and that I think might make you happy too.**

Holly Swenson, owner and artist in residence of HollyWoggles, draws small scale images and encases them in a pendant.  She started selling them in Art-O-Mat machines a while ago, and then after much begging from friends on social media she has opened her first Etsy store.

*Image courtesy of http://www.etsy.com/shop/HollyWoggles all rights reserved by the artist, Holly Swenson.*  The hummingbird from her animal series.
These are original, hand drawn, small scale images made with ink on archival paper.  Each image is a unique, wearable piece of art.  I think this is very smart art for a couple reasons.  #1 - It is affordable original art bought directly from the artist.  #2 - These pendants are great conversation starters, especially the protest series.  #3 - It's portable, you get to carry the art around with you, try doing that with a large canvas or sculpture.

*Image courtesy of http://www.etsy.com/shop/HollyWoggles all rights reserved by the artist, Holly Swenson.*  The bonsai tree from her nature series.
I personally would like to get 5 or 6 and then hang them in an installation on a blank wall in my home. That way people would be forced to get up close and really pay attention to the subject.  I often find that having to really work to look at an image can be far more thought provoking than a cursory glance at a straight forward and larger than life image.

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